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30th March 2011
glowing cyclist
i met a dude in buenos aires who had retired 11 years ago and been travelling the world ever since. despite not working he told me that he made more money then he spent every year and his aim was to spend at least one month in every country in the world before he died. this man was 11 years older than me. anyway conversation soon shifted from how he had clearly made better life choices than me to photography. while looking at photos on my laptop he castigated me for my screen setup. i had the gamma pushed up, which made everything look brighter and easier to see. he explained that this artificially brightened everything, making everything look grey instead of black and white. after a few tweaks he remedied things and the contrast and look was markedly different. the problem with this change is that i imagine most people who look at my photos online will be with computers that have the gamma pushed up. despite being told this is wrong, it means that most people will view my photos in the wrong way. that means if i process them in the right way i'll be one of the only ones to see that result. this came to mind when editing this photo, i got it looking how i wanted, with a nice contrast, silhouette and shadow. then out of curiosity i viewed it with my old, gamma-ridden settings and it all looked faded and washed out. i suppose it's too large a request to ask everyone who looks at my photos to adjust their monitors, so i'm not really sure what to do. let's just say if you don't think this photo is any good - blame it on the gamma.

here's the original
Except if you're a serious photographer you will have calibrated your monitor so that it shows 'true' colours. When I did mine (with the excellent ColorMunki) it made a huge difference.
posted by Keith on 31 Mar 2011 15:22
is that when you became a serious photographer then? ;-)
posted by tim on 31 Mar 2011 23:48
Serious as in competing with fellow club members - no quality implied!
posted by Keith on 01 Apr 2011 07:10
I reckon the photo looks fab, even though I'm in the harsh lights of camden library and doubtless have my computer configured all wrong.. How about you tell us how to sort the gamma out then?!
posted by sushila on 01 Apr 2011 15:52
on my pc i can right click on the desktop and adjust the graphics properties. on a mac, and this is just a stab in the dark, but i believe there's something called ColorMunki which has been referred to as excellent. word of warning though, i was watching a movie the other day and i had no idea what was happening in all of the night scenes. i appears as though gamma can be useful when you want to see anything other than a black screen when watching 'dark' videos.
posted by tim on 02 Apr 2011 16:53
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i've posted 38 photos taken with my canon powershot sx210 is - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

i've posted 110 photos taken with a shutter speed of 1/250 sec - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

i've posted 7 photos taken with an aperture of f/5.9

i've posted 7 photos taken with a focal length of 70.0 mm

i've posted 3 photos taken on 16th March 2011

30/03/2011
glowing cyclist
i met a dude in buenos aires who had retired 11 years ago and been travelling the world ever since. despite not working he told me that he made more money then he spent every year and his aim was to spend at least one month in every country in the world before he died. this man was 11 years older than me. anyway conversation soon shifted from how he had clearly made better life choices than me to photography. while looking at photos on my laptop he castigated me for my screen setup. i had the gamma pushed up, which made everything look brighter and easier to see. he explained that this artificially brightened everything, making everything look grey instead of black and white. after a few tweaks he remedied things and the contrast and look was markedly different. the problem with this change is that i imagine most people who look at my photos online will be with computers that have the gamma pushed up. despite being told this is wrong, it means that most people will view my photos in the wrong way. that means if i process them in the right way i'll be one of the only ones to see that result. this came to mind when editing this photo, i got it looking how i wanted, with a nice contrast, silhouette and shadow. then out of curiosity i viewed it with my old, gamma-ridden settings and it all looked faded and washed out. i suppose it's too large a request to ask everyone who looks at my photos to adjust their monitors, so i'm not really sure what to do. let's just say if you don't think this photo is any good - blame it on the gamma.

here's the original