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11th November 2012
such a pretty garden
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such a pretty garden

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such a pretty house and such a pretty garden, no alarms and no surprises, no alarms and no surprises, no alarms and no surprises please
this is kukenan, the tepui that greeted us when we arrived at the first camp site on our 6 day trek up the larger roraima tepui. we had been walking all afternoon and were hot, sweaty and thirsty by the time we arrived. our guide pointed out a river close by where we could fill up our water bottles, and a little bit downstream, bathe and cool off. i wasted no time in changing into my swimming shorts and jumping in the river. the current was a little strong but it was nice and refreshing to dip your head under and cool off. there were a few leaves floating around which without thinking i picked up and threw to the side. i saw a small twig floating behind me and i was about to do the same when it started to move independent of the water. it was then that i realised that the stick was black and red, squiggly and far more serpentine than your average piece of wood. i swam faster than i ever have before and pulled myself out of the water, too scared to even yelp, as the snake continued its carefree swim. i returned to the campsite and relayed my harrowing experience to the guide who said that based on my description it was most likely a coral snake. when i asked if they posed any danger he told me that they came in both venomous and non-venomous varieties. so how can you tell the difference? was my inevitable follow up. you can't was the answer i didn't want to hear, unless you study them at a close distance they look almost identical. hopefully you'll understand why i didn't remain floating long enough to make an accurate classification.

here's the original
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i've posted 871 photos taken with my nikon d60 - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

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11/11/2012
such a pretty garden
this is kukenan, the tepui that greeted us when we arrived at the first camp site on our 6 day trek up the larger roraima tepui. we had been walking all afternoon and were hot, sweaty and thirsty by the time we arrived. our guide pointed out a river close by where we could fill up our water bottles, and a little bit downstream, bathe and cool off. i wasted no time in changing into my swimming shorts and jumping in the river. the current was a little strong but it was nice and refreshing to dip your head under and cool off. there were a few leaves floating around which without thinking i picked up and threw to the side. i saw a small twig floating behind me and i was about to do the same when it started to move independent of the water. it was then that i realised that the stick was black and red, squiggly and far more serpentine than your average piece of wood. i swam faster than i ever have before and pulled myself out of the water, too scared to even yelp, as the snake continued its carefree swim. i returned to the campsite and relayed my harrowing experience to the guide who said that based on my description it was most likely a coral snake. when i asked if they posed any danger he told me that they came in both venomous and non-venomous varieties. so how can you tell the difference? was my inevitable follow up. you can't was the answer i didn't want to hear, unless you study them at a close distance they look almost identical. hopefully you'll understand why i didn't remain floating long enough to make an accurate classification.

here's the original