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23rd November 2012
the impermanence of it all
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the impermanence of it all

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this is the diner where we learned that people die before their time sometimes, the impermanence of it all don't you let it make you feel too very small
i knew that the galapagos were famous for cool creatures and contradicting creationism - but before i travelled to there i didn't really know so much about the islands themselves. the more that i read and learned, the more i realised that this was equally as fascinating. underneath the islands is a hotspot of magma which rises and pushes the earth's crust up to create volcanoes - eventually these volcanoes rise up above sea level to become islands. while the hotspot doesn't move, the tectonic plates above it do, which means as each island is formed it essentially moves out of the way to allow the next one to take its place. and in geological terms this all happens pretty fast, the oldest island is thought to be 3.3 million years old while the youngest around 500,000 years old. it's a cool little factory line of creation, with islands being born from volcanic eruption, moving along a tectonic conveyor belt away from hotspot before dying as they slowly erode into the ocean. yeah science!

here's the original
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i've posted 871 photos taken with my nikon d60 - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

i've posted 78 photos taken with a shutter speed of 1/200 sec - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

i've posted 48 photos taken with an aperture of f/7.1 - here are the last few i posted - view the rest here

this is the only picture i've taken with a focal length of 27.0 mm

i've posted 2 photos taken on 17th December 2011

23/11/2012
the impermanence of it all
i knew that the galapagos were famous for cool creatures and contradicting creationism - but before i travelled to there i didn't really know so much about the islands themselves. the more that i read and learned, the more i realised that this was equally as fascinating. underneath the islands is a hotspot of magma which rises and pushes the earth's crust up to create volcanoes - eventually these volcanoes rise up above sea level to become islands. while the hotspot doesn't move, the tectonic plates above it do, which means as each island is formed it essentially moves out of the way to allow the next one to take its place. and in geological terms this all happens pretty fast, the oldest island is thought to be 3.3 million years old while the youngest around 500,000 years old. it's a cool little factory line of creation, with islands being born from volcanic eruption, moving along a tectonic conveyor belt away from hotspot before dying as they slowly erode into the ocean. yeah science!

here's the original